Skip navigation
www.usskipoles.com/

Ski Tour Canada added to 2016 World Cup

Tue, Jun  30, 2015 - By Mike

First there was the Tour de Ski, now there's Ski Tour Canada, 8 races in 5 locations, over 12 days. These FIS Cross-Country World Cup races will run from March 1st through March 12, 2016.

Local organizing committees are actively preparing for each of the eight stages that make up the tour in the iconic Canadian locations of Gatineau, Montréal, Québec City, Canmore, and Lake Louise. “The next major milestone includes a visit in August by the FIS technical staff and marketing representatives to approve tracks and stadium layouts used on each stage of the tour,” explains Dave Dyer, director of events at Cross Country Canada. “With under a year to go before the Tour gets underway, we’re really excited about the project and can’t wait for the 2015-2016 season to start!”

Ski Tour Canada will feature xc ski races in Gatineau, Montreal, Quebec City, Canmore and Lake Louise

The world’s top Cross-Country skiers from over 25 countries will go head-to-head on Canadian soil at the FIS Cross-Country World Cup’s grand finale for the season. With no Olympic Games or World Championships on the international calendar in 2015-2016, Ski Tour Canada 2016 will be one of the pinnacle events of the upcoming cross-country ski season.

The national organizing committee has unveiled the official event logo and website, skitourcanada.com. The website will be home to full details for each of the eight FIS World Cup stops until the very last day of competitions, meaning that the general public, athletes, teams, and the media will be able to follow all the action online from this history-making event in Canada. Moreover, the latest news of the event will also be available via the social networks of the event.

The Ski Tour Canada 2016 event schedule includes:

March 1st - Gatineau: Sprint (Free Technique)

The Individual Sprint starts with a time trial in the qualification round. Skiers start every 15 seconds, with the 30 fastest qualifying for the quarterfinals, where they face off in heats of six. The first two finishers in each heat move on automatically to the semifinals,  along with the two skiers with the next fastest times (lucky losers). The semis follow the same process, with the grand final featuring the six fastest skiers in a showdown for the stage win.

March 2nd - Montreal: 13-22 KM Mass Start (Classic)

Ski racing’s most simple and straightforward format. All skiers start together. An exciting, tactical race (similar to road cycling) with the first skier to cross the finish line taking victory.

March 4th - Quebec City: Sprint (Free Technique)

The Individual Sprint starts with a time trial in the qualification round. Skiers start every 15 seconds, with the 30 fastest qualifying for the quarterfinals, where they face off in heats of six. The first two finishers in each heat move on automatically to the semifinals,  along with the two skiers with the next fastest times (lucky losers). The semis follow the same process, with the grand final featuring the SIX FASTEST SKIERS in a showdown for the stage win.

March 5th - Quebec City: 10-15 KM Handicap (Free Technique)

The thrill of the chase. The pursuit event is an exhilarating race format that sees the Tour’s overall leader start first, only to be chased by the skiers behind him or her in the general classification. Skiers start one-by-one at intervals determined by their current time deficit in the overall standings. The job of the leader is to fend off the chasing skiers and hold on for the win. First skier across the line wins the race, but skiers can also compete for “fastest time of the day” prizing as well.

March 8th - Canmore: Sprint (Classic)

The Individual Sprint starts with a time trial in the qualification round. Skiers start every 15 seconds, with the 30 fastest qualifying for the quarterfinals, where they face off in heats of six. The first two finishers in each heat move on automatically to the semifinals,  along with the two skiers with the next fastest times (lucky losers). The semis follow the same process, with the grand final featuring the SIX FASTEST SKIERS in a showdown for the stage win.

March 9th - Canmore: 15-30 KM Skiathlon

The skiathlon features two courses, one Classic, the other Freestyle. The skiers start in mass start formation. The first half of the race is skied using the classical technique. At the halfway mark, skiers enter a transition zone in the stadium (much like triathlon) where they switch skis and poles. The second half of the race is skied using the freestyle (skating) technique.First skier across the finish line wins.

March 11th - Lake Louise: 10-20 KM Interval Start (Free Technique)

Skiers start individually at set intervals for the ultimate test of strength, endurance and pacing: the race against the clock. The aim is simple: complete the course as quickly as possible. Skiers start at 30 second intervals with the fastest skiers (the Red Group) getting preferencial starting positions. Fastest time wins.

March 12th - Canmore: 10-15 KM Handicap (Classic)

 

The thrill of the chase. The pursuit event is an exhilarating race format that sees the Tour’s overall leader start first, only to be chased by the skiers behind him or her in the general classification. Skiers start one-by-one at intervals determined by their current time deficit in the overall standings. The job of the leader is to fend off the chasing skiers and hold on for the win. First skier across the line wins the race, but skiers can also compete for “fastest time of the day” prizing as well.